As President Donald Trump visits California Tuesday to see eight border wall prototypes erected in San Diego, citizens on the other side of those walls in Mexico scoff. According to a report in Yahoo News, at least one is “unimpressed” by the structures and doesn’t see them as a deterrent at all.

With an estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the United States, many of them Mexicans, a border wall to help prevent illegal crossings seems like an ideal solution. But Eladio Sanchez says he’s crossed many times, no matter what the barrier is, and he’s confident he can continue to do so.

According to the report: Sanchez has watched the barrier between the United States and Mexico grow over the years, blocking his view of the mountains more every time.

It started with a fence built during the Bill Clinton administration, then was beefed up with barbed wire.

“They just keep adding more, making it taller,” he said from his rooftop.

Sanchez is “unimpressed by the eight border wall prototypes looming over his house in Tijuana, Mexico,” the report says.

Yahoo continues: At age 30, [Sanchez] has already snuck over the border several times, and doesn’t expect Trump’s wall will have much effect on undocumented migrants like him.

Pointing to the only prototype with an angular barrier at the top — a concrete structure built by Texas Sterling Construction Company — Sanchez says that one might slow him down a little more than the others.

But, he told AFP, “you can get over it anyway.”

“It’s just a little more complicated. But people are always looking for a way to get over — out of necessity, not because we want to.”

Speaking of the existing barriers, Sergio Tamai, founder of immigrant advocacy group Angels Without Borders, said: “They are the proof that it’s possible to get through. More Mexicans are getting through all the time.”

From the report: On the Mexican side, the fence is covered in colorful graffiti, including the words “penetrate me” in giant letters.

Migrants, says Tamai, will always find a way.

“The desert. The mountains. Human traffickers. You can’t take away that desire to cross to the other side. That desire to build a better life for your family is such a strong, powerful energy.”

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