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In the early 2000s, millions of undocumented Mexicans crossed the U.S. border in search of work.

Nearly two decades later, border crossings look remarkably different. The number of Mexicans has plummeted. Other countries are now the source of most undocumented immigrants. And their motivation for taking the risk is different.

The shift is largely related to changing demographics in Mexico and the levels of violence and, in some cases, poverty in Central America.

The article goes on to state the following:

As the number of Mexicans attempting to cross the border has declined, the number of Central Americans—most from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras—has increased, with the demographics of the border crossers shifting as well.

Undocumented Hondurans and Salvadorans who travel to the U.S. tend to have more money and education than their peers, and they experience more violence, said Jonathan Hiskey, who analyzes survey data collected through the Latin American Public Opinion Project.

They also tend to arrive with other family members.

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