President Trump and First Lady Melania Trump traveled to Manchester, New Hampshire Monday to unveil the president’s plan to combat America’s opioid crisis.

When Trump first announced his candidacy for President of the United States, he lambasted illegal immigration, saying “They’re bringing drugs, they’re bringing crime….!”

He drilled down on that message Monday, saying more border security is needed to stop the constant flow of drugs into the United States, and called for a crackdown on sanctuary cities, saying “Ending sanctuary cities is crucial to stopping the drug addiction crisis.”

“Ninety percent of the heroin in America comes from our southern border, where eventually the Democrats will agree with us, and we’ll build the wall to keep the damn drugs out,” Trump said.

“In 2017, [Immigration and Customs Enforcement] arrested criminal aliens with 76,000 charges and convictions for dangerous drug crimes,” Trump said.

Liberals have slammed the president’s speech on social media, blasting him for daring to bring up illegal immigration in a speech about drug addiction.

PBS News reported: Trump says the nation “must get tough” with drug dealers, which includes utilizing the death penalty. He said “failure is not an option” and vowed that “addiction is not our future.”

He also vowed to help create “a generation of drug-free children.” And he complained that, under the current law, a dealer could sell a drug that could kill hundreds but only receive a short prison sentence.

The Hill also reported on the main points of Trump’s plan: The speech marked the unveiling of the White House’s plan to combat the opioid epidemic, consisting of a three-pronged approach:  reducing the demand and over-prescription of opioids, cutting off the supply of illegal drugs and boosting access to treatment.

The plans aims to reduce the number of opioid prescriptions by one-third over three years. It also includes measures that addiction advocates have supported in the past, including increasing access to the gold standard of addiction treatment and incentivizing states to move to a national database monitoring opioid prescriptions to help flag people requesting numerous prescriptions.

In a controversial move, the plan is also seeking stiffer penalties for high-volume drug traffickers, which includes a mandate to the Department of Justice to seek the death penalty when appropriate under current law.